IPL Auctions 2014: Right To Match Cards Explained

The IPL Auctions are closing in fast, and, as always, they promise to be a gripping experience, with almost as much tension and excitement as the real league itself. This years’ auctions, however, promise to be much more exciting than the ones before, primarily because of the implementation of several new measures. Amongst these is the “Right to Match card” concept. This may seem a complex concept, but in reality it’s not. It’s just like a stimulant to add an extra variable to the auctions, and make them even more exciting. The number of Right to Match cards a team has is based off how many players they retained. This chart will represent that:

 

Number of Players Retained Number of RTM cards

5

1

4

1

3

1

2

2

1

2

0

3

 

So as you can see, the number of players retained is inversely proportional to the number of RTM cards the franchise has. Since nearly every franchise decided to retain someone, the Delhi Daredevils is probably the only team with 3 RTM cards. The number of cards each franchise has is as follows:

Franchise Retentions RTM Cards Remaining Sum
Mumbai Indians

5

1

Rs. 21 crore

Chennai Super Kings

5

1

Rs. 21 crore

Rajasthan Royals

5

1

Rs. 22.5 crore

Sunrisers Hyderabad

2

2

Rs. 38 crore

Royal Challengers Bangalore

3

1

Rs. 30.5 crore

Kings XI Punjab

2

2

Rs. 43.5 crore

Kolkata Knight Riders

2

2

Rs. 38 crore

Delhi Daredevils

0

3

Rs. 60 crore

 

Now how the card itself works, is as follows. The player comes up for auction, and is auctioned as normal. Once the player receives no further bids, the auctioneer (hopefully Richard Madlee) will announce him sold. Then, he will ask if the players’ former franchise wishes to use an RTM card. If the franchise uses a card, then they will get the player at the final bid made. You may think that the franchises might as well use it on their best former player, and it will pretty much like a 6th retention. However, it has a different twist to it. To display this, I will use the practical example of Micheal Hussey. He was (surprisingly) released by CSK, and will feature in the auctions. So lets assume that he comes up, and all the teams start bidding like crazy.  They bid and bid and bid, and eventually Mumbai Indians raise the baton for 5.00 crores, and no one bids any further. Then, when the auctioneer hits the hammer, he will ask CSK if they wish to use their RTM card. This is an example of where things get complicating. While CSK have the chance to buy Hussey back, would it be worth paying up ¼ of their remaining purse just on him? That is why the RTM is a little more ambiguous than retention, and adds an extra twist to the auction. Hopefully this article has given you an insight on the RTM card factor, and helped you understand it better. Now lastly, here are my predictions as to who the franchises will use their RTM cards on, based on my assumptions and whatever information I’ve managed to find:

Franchise Player(s) the card(s) will be used on
Mumbai Indians Mitchell Johnson
Chennai Super Kings Chris Morris
Rajasthan Royals Brad Hodge
Sunrisers Hyderabad Quinton de Kock, Amit Mishra
Royal Challengers Bangalore Vinay Kumar
Kings XI Punjab David Hussey, Shaun Marsh
Kolkata Knight Riders Jacques Kallis, Eoin Morgan
Delhi Daredevils David Warner, Mahela Jaywardene, Umesh Yadav