Between Two Cups: A 4-Year Journey

 

Yuvraj Singh was Man of the Series in the last World Cup, but 4 years have led to India not selecting him for the squad this year. Image from galleryhip.com

Yuvraj Singh was Man of the Series in the last World Cup, but 4 years have led to India not selecting him for the squad this year.
Image from galleryhip.com

In 2011, during the World Cup, I was in 7th Grade. I had very little homework, and a lot of fun. Sreesanth was still playing cricket, CSK was hardly a controversial franchise, and guys like Sehwag, Gambhir, Yuvraj, Zaheer and Harbhajan were all still in the Indian side.

It’s been four years. Four long years. Four years since Dhoni thumped Nuwan Kulasekara for the six that won India their first World Cup since 1983. Now, at the dawn of the 2015 World Cup, it feels like a whole age has passed. There’s been so much change in the world that it’s almost hard to believe that the 2011 World Cup wasn’t played during World War II. I’m in 11th grade, and my workload is the cricket equivalent of facing Sunil Narine in Eden Gardens right after a rainstorm: squishy, fatiguing, and all in all agonizing. Sreesanth, along with a whole army of other players involved in spot-fixing, is now out of commision. Even Kevin Pietersen, one of England’s “immortal players” in my opinion, is no longer playing international cricket. Sachin Tendulkar retired. Phil Hughes passed away. Dhoni retired from Test cricket. And of course, this website now celebrates it’s four-year anniversary this coming Friday.

This World Cup features teams that people – if brought from 2011 on a time machine – would be very surprised at. Where’s Sehwag? When did Afghanistan get so good? Who the heck is Glenn Maxwell? It just goes to show that it’s been a dynamic four years. Teams have suckled the sweet nectar of success, and tasted the bitterness medicine of defeat. Some teams have risen resurgent from the ashes, like New Zealand; but for other teams – like India and Sri Lanka – the sun just seems to be setting a little. Regardless, we must remind ourselves that as in history, this is just but a phase in the ever-dynamic world of cricket, and everyone will experience both the roses and their thorns. This World Cup (or any World Cup for that matter) is nothing more than a test to show us who’s enjoying the high tide now, and who isn’t. Nonetheless, it will be a fun contest to watch.